Life Near the Rax is pretty great

We’re doing Workaway in the Austrian Alps at the moment, and the place that we’re staying is really great. I’ll post some photos that I’ve taken in addition to these, but I wanted to post the ones from our amazing Dolomites self tour as well.

I’ve been really lazy about Lightroom in the meantime, so here are a couple of the shots from a (very) long day of sunrise, sunset, and astro photography. All of these images as panoramas, shot with my tripod and stitched together to make the final image.

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And here are the promised shots of our current life here in the Raxalpes.

If anyone is interested, I’d love to write about Workaway and how it works as a travel amplifier.

More photography! MORE MORE MORE

I’m not really writing much these days again, but I take photos every day. I have a backlog to edit at least three weeks long, which means I still haven’t edited the ones from Hoi An in Vietnam nor the many from our short jaunt to London.

Here are some from a great hike the other day.

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And a gallery of wildflowers here in the Alpine high summer.

More adventures soon.

All Panoramas, All The Time

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“But you can just use your phone to make those, right?”

Technically right. But it wouldn’t be possible to take the one above, which is a long exposure, panoramic selfie. Who would hold the camera?

But the panoramas I’m making these days are a tad more involved than ones from the phone. These are all panoramas made with a DSLR camera and a neutral density filter, using the degrees settings on my brand-new tripod. I love panoramas and I only just learned how to do this in February (in beautiful Rocky Mountain National Park).

The main differences between a phone panorama and one done on a DSLR are the precision with which I can focus, and the level of resolution that is possible. In each of these photos, there is more than one frame blended into each other to form a single image. This is the best way that I can capture what the high Alps here in Italy really look like, given that they are so impressive and GIANT in person.

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I don’t have Photoshop at the minute, so it’s difficult to pull off the kinds of Focus Stacking that many landscape photographers use these days. The idea is to have focus all the way through the image, which is something that can only be done with several images blended together. By blending several frames with different focus points together into a panoramic shot, I can achieve a similar look without the use of Photoshop. This is the best example of the technique.

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I love learning new things, and this summer will most likely be full of photographic opportunities. There’s a gallery to view them in more detail below. Keep coming back to see more!