Beer in Situ: Birra Pejo

A long-overdue review of this great little beer place in the Italian Alps. It was so welcoming and became our home brewery for six weeks when we lived in Cogolo this summer.

The Pertinents

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The Family

This is truly a family owned and operated brewery. Often when we visited, Marco and Angela would be manning the brewery or the taproom (and most of the time, both!) while their children played. The grandparents also help out and the family even brings their new baby to work. It’s such a welcoming atmosphere.

The Water

“It would be a shame not to make beer with this water.” – Translated from the Birra Pejo website.

Cogolo is home to Acqua Pejo, a famous mineral water distribution centre which bottles from the source at 1400m altitude. We spent more than a month exploring the valley which is home to Birra Pejo and found more waterfalls than almost anywhere we’ve ever travelled. It’s second only to Iceland in this regard.

I love to imagine the waterfalls filling the water with great energy and sending it bubbling downstream to the towns, and being made into excellent beers.

The Beer

IMG_6953The styles that they produce at Birra Pejo are classic, but often with a twist. For example, their Alpina (named for the Stella Alpina, AKA Edelweiss flowers that are on the high alpine tracks nearby) features pink pepper in the brewing process. The Aquila belgian ale is our favourite of their brews, with a balanced malt profile and clean taste. They brew regularly and often make seasonal ales that are in very limited quantity. All the prices are quite the steal if one takes into account the handmade quality of the beer.

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This brewery is one of our favourites that we’ve found in all our beery travels. We hope to come back to visit some day soon.

 

 

All Panoramas, All The Time

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“But you can just use your phone to make those, right?”

Technically right. But it wouldn’t be possible to take the one above, which is a long exposure, panoramic selfie. Who would hold the camera?

But the panoramas I’m making these days are a tad more involved than ones from the phone. These are all panoramas made with a DSLR camera and a neutral density filter, using the degrees settings on my brand-new tripod. I love panoramas and I only just learned how to do this in February (in beautiful Rocky Mountain National Park).

The main differences between a phone panorama and one done on a DSLR are the precision with which I can focus, and the level of resolution that is possible. In each of these photos, there is more than one frame blended into each other to form a single image. This is the best way that I can capture what the high Alps here in Italy really look like, given that they are so impressive and GIANT in person.

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I don’t have Photoshop at the minute, so it’s difficult to pull off the kinds of Focus Stacking that many landscape photographers use these days. The idea is to have focus all the way through the image, which is something that can only be done with several images blended together. By blending several frames with different focus points together into a panoramic shot, I can achieve a similar look without the use of Photoshop. This is the best example of the technique.

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I love learning new things, and this summer will most likely be full of photographic opportunities. There’s a gallery to view them in more detail below. Keep coming back to see more!